Can Acoustic Guitars Be Plugged Into Amplifiers?

14 minutes read

Yes, acoustic guitars can be plugged into amplifiers. By using a pickup or a microphone, the sound of the acoustic guitar can be amplified through an amplifier. This allows the player to achieve a louder sound and potentially add effects such as reverb or distortion. Plugging an acoustic guitar into an amplifier can be particularly useful for live performances or recording in a studio where a higher volume and clarity are needed. Additionally, some amplifiers are specifically designed for acoustic guitars, offering a more natural and balanced sound reproduction.

Best Acoustic Guitars of May 2024

1
Yamaha FG800J Solid Top Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar, Natural

Rating is 5 out of 5

Yamaha FG800J Solid Top Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar, Natural

  • Solid Sitka spruce top
  • Nato and mahogany back & sides
  • Rosewood fingerboard
  • Rosewood bridge
2
Fender Acoustic Guitar, CD-60S, with 2-Year Warranty, Dreadnought Classic Design with Rounded Walnut Fingerboard, Glossed Finish, All-Mahogany Construction

Rating is 4.9 out of 5

Fender Acoustic Guitar, CD-60S, with 2-Year Warranty, Dreadnought Classic Design with Rounded Walnut Fingerboard, Glossed Finish, All-Mahogany Construction

  • One right-handed Fender CD-60S Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar
  • Dreadnought Body: This guitar’s dreadnought body shape resonates with a bold and rich bass tone, great for playing country, folk or bluegrass
  • Rock Steady Tuners: Chrome die-cast tuners help keep your guitar tuned with the perfect amount of tension, and they don't attract much dust or grime
3
Fender Squier Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar - Black Learn-to-Play Bundle with Gig Bag, Tuner, Strap, Strings, String Winder, Picks, Fender Play Online Lessons, and Austin Bazaar Instructional DVD

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

Fender Squier Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar - Black Learn-to-Play Bundle with Gig Bag, Tuner, Strap, Strings, String Winder, Picks, Fender Play Online Lessons, and Austin Bazaar Instructional DVD

  • The Squier SA-150 is a full-size steel-string acoustic that offers big sound at a small price.
  • This guitar also features scalloped "X"-bracing, mahogany neck and a durable dark-stained maple fingerboard to give you an instrument that looks as good as it sounds.
  • With its slim, easy-to-play neck and full-bodied dreadnought tone, the SA-150 is an ideal choice for all rookie strummers.
4
Squier by Fender Acoustic Guitar, with 2-Year Warranty, Dreadnought with Maple Fingerboard, Glossed Natural Finish, Mahogany Back and Side, Mahogany Neck, SA-150 Model

Rating is 4.7 out of 5

Squier by Fender Acoustic Guitar, with 2-Year Warranty, Dreadnought with Maple Fingerboard, Glossed Natural Finish, Mahogany Back and Side, Mahogany Neck, SA-150 Model

  • One right-handed Fender SA-150 Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar
  • Dreadnought Body: This guitar’s dreadnought body shape resonates with a bold and rich bass tone, great for playing country, folk or bluegrass
  • Durable Materials: All-Laminate construction allows this guitar to last long and sound as great as it looks a an affordable price
5
Fender FA-25 Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar, Beginner Guitar, with 2-Year Warranty, Includes Free Lessons, Natural

Rating is 4.6 out of 5

Fender FA-25 Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar, Beginner Guitar, with 2-Year Warranty, Includes Free Lessons, Natural

  • One right-handed Fender Alternative Series Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar – a perfect beginner guitar for both kids and adults
  • Backed by a 75 year legacy of quality and craftsmanship -- the FA Series has all the sound and style of Fender's iconic acoustic guitars with specially designed features for beginners.
  • This guitar’s dreadnought body shape resonates with a bold and rich bass tone, great for playing country, folk or bluegrass
6
Jasmine S34C NEX Acoustic Guitar,Natural

Rating is 4.5 out of 5

Jasmine S34C NEX Acoustic Guitar,Natural

  • Gloss Natural
  • Dreadnought body style
  • Laminate Spruce top
  • Sapele back and sides
  • Rosewood Fingerboard
7
Yamaha F325D Acoustic Guitar, Natural

Rating is 4.4 out of 5

Yamaha F325D Acoustic Guitar, Natural

  • The perfect guitar for beginners
  • Legendary Yamaha build quality
  • Spruce Top
  • Rosewood Fretboard
  • Chrome Tuners
8
Ibanez AW54OPN Artwood Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar - Open Pore Natural

Rating is 4.3 out of 5

Ibanez AW54OPN Artwood Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar - Open Pore Natural

  • Dreadnought body
  • Solid mahogany top
  • Mahogany back & sides
  • Mahogany neck
  • Rosewood bridge and fretboard


What is the recommended wattage for an amplifier for an acoustic guitar?

The recommended wattage for an amplifier for an acoustic guitar typically ranges from 15-50 watts. This range is suitable for most acoustic guitars as it provides enough power to amplify the sound without overwhelming the natural tone of the instrument. It is important to consider the size of the venue you will be performing in when choosing the wattage of your amplifier. Smaller venues may only require a lower wattage amplifier, while larger venues may need a higher wattage amplifier to project the sound effectively. Ultimately, it is important to test out different wattage options to determine what works best for your specific needs and playing style.


How to balance the sound levels between an acoustic guitar and other instruments through an amplifier?

Balancing the sound levels between an acoustic guitar and other instruments through an amplifier can be achieved by following these steps:

  1. Start by setting the level of each instrument individually. Begin with the acoustic guitar and adjust the volume on the amplifier until the guitar’s sound is at the desired level.
  2. Have the other instrument(s) play at the same time as the acoustic guitar and adjust their volumes to a level that complements the guitar’s sound without overpowering it. Listen for any clashing frequencies or muddiness in the mix.
  3. Experiment with the EQ controls on the amplifier to fine-tune the sound levels of each instrument. You may need to adjust the bass, mid, and treble frequencies to create a balanced mix where each instrument can be heard clearly.
  4. Pay attention to the overall mix and make adjustments as needed. Ensure that every instrument is audible and balanced with the others to create a cohesive sound.
  5. Consider using effects pedals or processors to further enhance the sound of the acoustic guitar and other instruments. Reverb, chorus, delay, and other effects can help enhance the overall sound and blend the instruments together seamlessly.


By following these steps and paying attention to the individual sound levels, EQ settings, and overall mix, you can achieve a balanced and cohesive sound between an acoustic guitar and other instruments through an amplifier.


How to achieve a natural, acoustic sound when using an amplifier with a guitar?

  1. Use a high-quality amplifier with good sound reproduction capabilities. Cheaper amplifiers may produce a more distorted or artificial sound.
  2. Adjust the EQ settings on your amplifier to create a balanced tone. Start with a flat EQ and then make small adjustments to tailor the sound to your liking.
  3. Use a clean setting on your amplifier rather than an overdrive or distortion setting. This will help maintain the natural sound of the guitar.
  4. Experiment with different microphone placements if you are miking your amplifier. Placing the microphone closer to the center of the speaker cone will result in a brighter sound, while placing it towards the edge will produce a warmer sound.
  5. Consider using a transparent overdrive pedal to add some warmth and depth to your sound without altering the natural tone of the guitar.
  6. Play with dynamics and picking technique to add nuance and expression to your playing. Lighter picking will result in a softer, more delicate sound, while heavier picking will produce a more aggressive tone.
  7. Practice good tone etiquette by keeping the volume at a reasonable level. Cranking up the volume too high can lead to unwanted distortion and a less natural sound.


Overall, achieving a natural, acoustic sound when using an amplifier with a guitar requires careful consideration of equipment, settings, and playing techniques. Experiment with different options to find the perfect balance that suits your style and preferences.


What is the impact of string choice on the tone of an amplified acoustic guitar?

String choice can have a significant impact on the tone of an amplified acoustic guitar. Different strings can produce varying levels of brightness, warmth, sustain, and overall tonal balance. Here are a few ways in which string choice can affect the tone of an amplified acoustic guitar:

  1. Material: Strings can be made from different materials, such as bronze, phosphor bronze, nickel, and stainless steel. Each material has its own unique tonal characteristics, with some producing a brighter and more articulate sound, while others result in a warmer and richer tone.
  2. Gauge: The gauge (thickness) of the strings can also impact the tone of an acoustic guitar. Lighter gauge strings tend to produce a brighter and more responsive sound, while heavier gauge strings can provide more volume and sustain. Finding the right balance between gauge and tone can help achieve the desired sound.
  3. Coating: Some strings come with a coating, such as phosphor bronze or polymer, which can affect the tone by reducing finger squeak and extending the lifespan of the strings. Coated strings tend to have a warmer tone and smoother feel compared to uncoated strings.
  4. Tension: The tension of the strings can influence the overall feel and response of an acoustic guitar. Higher tension strings can provide more clarity and definition in the sound, while lower tension strings may have a softer and more mellow tone.


Overall, selecting the right strings for an amplified acoustic guitar can help enhance its tone and playability, allowing players to achieve their desired sound and musical expression. Experimenting with different string materials, gauges, coatings, and tensions can help find the perfect match for a specific guitar and playing style.


How to properly care for an amplifier when using it with an acoustic guitar?

  1. Keep the amplifier clean by regularly dusting it with a soft cloth. Avoid using harsh chemicals or abrasive materials that could damage the amplifier.
  2. Use a surge protector to prevent damage from power surges and fluctuations.
  3. When not in use, unplug the amplifier to prevent unnecessary wear and tear on the electronics.
  4. Avoid exposure to extreme temperatures, which can damage the amplifier's components. Keep it in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight.
  5. Handle the amplifier with care when transporting it to gigs or rehearsals. Use a padded carrying case or bag to protect it from bumps and scratches.
  6. Check the connections and cables regularly to ensure they are securely plugged in and functioning properly.
  7. Follow the manufacturer's recommended maintenance schedule for any necessary repairs or servicing.
  8. Be mindful of the volume level when playing through the amplifier to prevent overheating or blowing out the speaker.
  9. Do not overload the amplifier with a signal that is too hot, as this can cause distortion and damage to the circuits.
  10. Finally, enjoy your amplifier and acoustic guitar setup by practicing and playing music that you love!
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