How to Change the Password For A PostgreSQL User?

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To change the password for a PostgreSQL user, you can follow these steps:

  1. Connect to the PostgreSQL database as a superuser or a user with relevant privileges. You can use the command-line tool psql or any other PostgreSQL client that allows executing SQL commands.
  2. Once connected, issue the following command to set a new password for the user: ALTER USER username WITH PASSWORD 'new_password'; Replace username with the actual name of the PostgreSQL user and new_password with the desired new password.
  3. After executing the command, you should see a message indicating that the user's password has been successfully changed.
  4. Verify the password change by attempting to connect to the PostgreSQL database using the updated credentials.


Remember to use a strong and secure password to ensure the safety of your PostgreSQL user account.

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How to configure password authentication for PostgreSQL?

To configure password authentication for PostgreSQL, you can follow these steps:

  1. Open the PostgreSQL configuration file 'pg_hba.conf'. This file is located in the data directory of your PostgreSQL installation. On Linux, the default location is '/etc/postgresql//main/pg_hba.conf'. On Windows, the default location is 'C:\Program Files\PostgreSQL\data\pg_hba.conf'.
  2. In the 'pg_hba.conf' file, locate the section that contains the lines for IPv4 and IPv6 connections: # IPv4 local connections: host all all 127.0.0.1/32 md5 # IPv6 local connections: host all all ::1/128 md5
  3. Add a new line to specify the password authentication method for a specific user, database, and connection type. The format is: For example, to allow password authentication for a user named 'myuser' connecting to a database named 'mydb': host mydb myuser md5 The 'md5' method encrypts the password and stores it as an MD5 hash. You can also use 'password' for plain-text password authentication, but it is not recommended.
  4. Save the 'pg_hba.conf' file.
  5. Restart the PostgreSQL service for the changes to take effect. On Linux, you can use the command: sudo systemctl restart postgresql On Windows, you can use the Services management console or run the command: net stop postgresql && net start postgresql


Now, when a client connects to the PostgreSQL server with the specified credentials, it will be prompted for a password. Make sure to choose strong, unique passwords for your users to ensure the security of your database.


How to set a password policy for PostgreSQL users?

To set a password policy for PostgreSQL users, you can follow these steps:

  1. Open your PostgreSQL configuration file. The location of the configuration file can vary depending on your operating system, but it is typically named "postgresql.conf" and located in the PostgreSQL data directory.
  2. Look for the "password_requirements" parameter in the configuration file. If it doesn't exist, you can add it. This parameter defines the password policy and its associated requirements.
  3. Set the desired password requirements by specifying the value for the "password_requirements" parameter. The format of this value depends on the version of PostgreSQL you're using. Here are a few examples: PostgreSQL versions 12 and above: password_requirements = ujson:{"upper": 1, "digit": 1, "special": 1, "length": 8} This example enforces that passwords must contain at least one uppercase character, one digit, one special character, and be at least 8 characters long. You can customize the requirements as needed. PostgreSQL versions 11 and below: password_requirements = 'ujson:{"upper": 1, "digit": 1, "special": 1, "length": 8}' The format remains the same, but the parameter is quoted differently.
  4. Save the configuration file and restart the PostgreSQL server for the changes to take effect.


Once you've set the password policy, PostgreSQL will enforce the specified requirements for all new passwords created for its users.


How to change the default password encryption algorithm in PostgreSQL?

To change the default password encryption algorithm in PostgreSQL, you need to modify the configuration file (postgresql.conf) and make some changes in the database.

  1. Open the postgresql.conf file using a text editor. The location of this file may vary depending on your operating system, but it is usually found in the data directory of your PostgreSQL installation.
  2. Search for the password_encryption parameter in the postgresql.conf file. By default, it is set to md5. Uncomment the line by removing the preceding # if necessary.
  3. Change the parameter value to the desired algorithm. PostgreSQL supports multiple encryption algorithms, including md5, scram-sha-256, and password. For example, if you want to use SCRAM-SHA-256 as the default algorithm, set the password_encryption parameter to scram-sha-256.
  4. Save the postgresql.conf file.
  5. Restart the PostgreSQL server for the changes to take effect. The process to do so depends on your operating system.
  6. Connect to the PostgreSQL database using a database client or the command line.
  7. In the database, modify the password encryption for existing users using the ALTER USER command. For example, to change the password encryption for a user named "myuser" to SCRAM-SHA-256, run the following command:
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ALTER USER myuser PASSWORD 'mypassword' USING scram-sha-256;


This changes the stored password for the user to use the new encryption algorithm.


Please note that changing the default password encryption algorithm does not automatically update the encryption for existing user passwords. You have to modify them separately using the ALTER USER command.


How to revoke privileges from a PostgreSQL user?

To revoke privileges from a PostgreSQL user, you can use the REVOKE command. Here's how:

  1. Connect to your PostgreSQL database using an administrative account, such as the postgres account or any other account with sufficient privileges.
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psql -U postgres -h localhost


  1. Once connected, run the REVOKE command to revoke privileges from the user. The basic syntax for revoking privileges is:
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REVOKE privilege_type [, ...] ON [TABLE] table_name FROM user_name [, ...];


Replace privilege_type with the specific privilege you want to revoke, such as SELECT, UPDATE, INSERT, DELETE, etc. Replace table_name with the name of the table, and replace user_name with the name of the user you want to revoke privileges from.


For example, to revoke the SELECT privilege on a table named employees from a user named example_user, you would run:

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REVOKE SELECT ON TABLE employees FROM example_user;


  1. Confirm the revocation by running a query to display the privileges for the user on the table:
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\dR+ employees


You should see that the revoked privilege is no longer listed for the specified user.


Note: In addition to revoking privileges on tables, you can also revoke privileges on other database objects, such as sequences, views, schemas, etc. The syntax and process for revoking privileges on these objects may vary slightly.

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