What $() Syntax Means For Groovy Language?

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In Groovy, the $() syntax is used for string interpolation. It allows for the evaluation of expressions inside a string. When using this syntax, any Groovy expression contained within the $() will be evaluated and the result will be included in the final string. This can be a convenient way to dynamically construct strings with variable values or the results of calculations.

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How to escape special characters in the $() syntax in Groovy?

To escape special characters in the $() syntax in Groovy, you can use the backslash \ character. For example, if you want to include a literal dollar sign within the $() syntax, you can escape it like this:

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println "The price is \$100"


This will output:

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The price is $100


Similarly, you can escape other special characters like parentheses or backticks in the same way.


How to print variables using the $() syntax in Groovy?

In Groovy, you can print variables using the $() syntax within a double-quoted string.


Here is an example:

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def name = "John"
def age = 30

println "My name is ${name} and I am ${age} years old."


When you run this code, it will print:

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My name is John and I am 30 years old.


This syntax allows you to easily include variables within a string without the need for concatenation.


How to customize the output format of variables using the $() syntax in Groovy?

In Groovy, you can customize the output format of variables using the $() syntax by using String interpolation. Here's an example of how you can use this syntax to customize the output format of variables:

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def name = "John"
def age = 30

def formattedOutput = "Name: ${name}, Age: ${age}"
println formattedOutput


In this example, the ${} syntax is used to include the variables name and age in the formattedOutput string. You can also customize the output format by adding formatting specifiers inside the ${} syntax. For example:

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def amount = 1000.5
def formattedAmount = "Amount: $${amount.format('%,.2f')}"
println formattedAmount


In this example, the amount variable is formatted as a currency value with two decimal places using the %.2f formatting specifier.


You can refer to the Groovy documentation for more information on formatting specifiers and other options for customizing the output format of variables using String interpolation in Groovy.

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